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Testimonials

MARY BETH FITZGERALD 09.30.19
I credit my training sessions with Vince for helping me improve my shoulder strength, function, and pain  after a serious shoulder injury. After a thorough assessment, Vince designed a training program that built on my strengths while keeping my limitations in mind. He was there for me 100%.

Why I think Vince was especially helpful:
  1. 1)  Extensive knowledge of muscles and how they should work together. 
  2. 2)  Clear communication,encouragement and feedback.
  3. 3)  Wanted to maximize my potential while teaching safe strengthening and muscle/body control. 


I think successful training is both an art and a science and Vince is skilled and talented and I met my fitness goals with his direction.

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http://www.dorkypantsr.us/bike-tire-pressure-calculator.html

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